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How to BBQ the best Steak on a Gas Grill for Maximum Flavor

Ladies and gentlemen, gather around! It’s time to put those aprons on, light that gas grill, and get ready to cook a steak that will make your taste buds dance with joy.

Cooking a steak on a gas grill is an art, and I’m here to show you how to master it.

Whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned pro, there’s always something new to learn when it comes to grilling. We’ll go over everything from choosing the right cut of steak to setting up the grill and cooking the steak to perfection.

We will also provide tips and suggestions to help you achieve the best results. This guide is sure to help you improve your grilling skills and impress your friends and family with your steak-grilling abilities.

So, put down the phone and pay attention, because, by the end of this guide, you’ll be grilling steaks on a gas grill like a boss.

And who knows, you might even impress a date or two with your newfound skills. So, grab your tongs, and let’s get sizzling!

Selecting the Best Cut of Steak for Grilling

Grades of Steak | Best Cuts of Steak for Grilling | Ideal Thickness of a Steak for Grilling | The Level of Marbling

When it comes to grilling a steak, the cut you choose can make all the difference in the world when you’re talking about the taste and texture of the finished product. Choosing the right cut of steak for grilling is the key to the best outcome.

But with so many different cuts available, it can be tough to know which one to pick. The first thing to consider is the level of marbling – that’s the amount of white flecks you see in the meat. The more marbling, the more flavorful and tender the steak will be. So, if you’re looking for a juicy and delicious steak, go for one with a good amount of marbling.

Another important factor to consider is the thickness of the steak. A thicker cut will take longer to cook, but it should also be juicier and more flavorful.

Most of this is tied to the different grades of a steak, which we will talk more about next.

Selecting the Best Cut of Steak for Grilling

Grades of Steak

Prime | Choice | Select

You’re probably wondering what all these fancy terms like “Prime”, “Choice” and “Select” mean when you’re buying steak, right? Well, let me break it down for you.

When it comes to buying steak, the grades are determined by the quality and marbling, or the amount of fat within the meat, and they can have a big impact on the taste and texture of the steak. So, it’s important to know what you’re getting.

Prime

“Prime” is the top grade and is the most marbled and considered the best quality. Prime steak is typically from young, well-fed beef cattle, and it has a high level of marbling, resulting in tender, juicy and flavorful beef. Just expect to pay a little more for a high-quality Prime steak.

This stuff is like gold, it’s harder to find and it’s super flavorful and juicy. If you’re lucky enough to get your hands on some Prime beef, you’re in for a real treat.

Choice

“Choice” is the next best thing and it’s the most widely available grade in supermarkets and restaurants. It is also less expensive than a  Prime cut.

It’s still pretty good quality, but it has less marbling than Prime beef and it might not be as juicy and flavorful as Prime. But still a great option to enjoy a delicious steak.

Select

“Select” is the lowest grade of steak that is commonly sold in supermarkets. It’s leaner than Choice and Prime beef and has less marbling, which can make it less tender and flavorful. As you’ve probably already guessed, Select is the least expensive of the three, but just like most things in life, you get what you pay for.

So, now you know the basic grades of steak. It’s up to you to decide which one to go for, depending on your taste, budget, and occasion. But one thing is for sure, you’re gonna enjoy a delicious steak no matter what grade you choose!

Best Cuts of Steak for Grilling

Ribeye | New York Strip | T-bone | Flank Steak

Alright, it’s time to talk about the best cuts of steak.

When it comes to grilling, you want a cut of steak that has the perfect balance of fat and flavor and can stand up to the grill’s high heat.

Of course, the best way to find out what cut of steak you like the most is to experiment with different cuts and cook them to your liking.

The following cuts of steak are my recommendations for what you are looking for.

Ribeye

First on the list is the Ribeye. This cut is taken from the rib section of the cow and it’s packed with flavor and marbling.

Ribeye is known for its rich flavor and tenderness and is often considered a top choice.

It’s a thicker cut of steak, so it’s perfect for grilling and can handle high heat. Plus, the fat melts and bastes the steak while it cooks, making it super juicy and delicious.

Bone-in Ribeye

New York Strip

Next up is the strip steak, also known as a New York strip or Kansas City strip.

This cut is taken from the short loin and it’s a little leaner than the ribeye, but it still has plenty of flavor and a firm texture.

It’s a great option if you’re looking for a steak that’s not too fatty but still packed with flavor.

New York Strip Steak

T-bone

The T-bone steak is another great option for grilling.

It’s a thick cut of steak that has a T-shaped bone in the middle. It’s got both a strip steak and a tenderloin on either side.

It’s a real crowd-pleaser and a great option if you’re grilling for a group.

T-Bone Steak

Flank Steak

Finally, if you’re looking for a leaner option, flank steak is a great choice.

It’s a thinner cut of steak that’s taken from the abdominal muscles of the cow, and it’s got a lot of flavor. It’s great when using marinades, and it’s perfect for grilling as long as you slice it against the grain when serving.

So, there you have it! These are some of the best cuts of steak for grilling. Whether you’re a ribeye lover or a strip steak fan, there’s something for everyone.

Flank Steak

Ideal Thickness of a Steak for Grilling

Alright, so you’re about to grill a steak and you’re wondering how thick it should be. Well, let me tell you, the thickness of a steak can make a big difference in how it turns out.

The sweet spot is around 1 inch thick. This thickness allows for even cooking, good charring, and a perfect balance of tenderness and juiciness. You’ll get a nice crust on the outside and a juicy, tender inside.

Now, if you’re grilling a T-bone or ribeye, you can go a little thicker, around 1-2 inches. These cuts can handle a little more heat and cooking time, so a thicker steak will still come out perfect. This thickness allows for an even cook throughout the steak, while also allowing the exterior to develop a nice char.

Cooking a thicker cut of steak also allows for more flexibility in terms of doneness, as it can be cooked to a variety of temperatures without drying out. You’ll have more room for error and can cook it to your liking.

But, if you’re grilling a flank or skirt steak, you want to keep it on the thinner side, around 0.5 inches. They should be cooked at a lower heat and for a shorter period of time. These cuts are a bit more delicate and can get tough if they’re cooked too long. So, a thinner steak will cook faster and stay nice and tender.

It’s also worth noting that the thickness of the steak can vary depending on the cut and the breed of the animal. So, it’s always a good idea to check the thickness of the steak you’re buying and adjust the cooking time accordingly.

The Level of Marbling

If you’re wondering what all this talk about “marbling” means, let me break it down for you.

Marbling refers to small flecks of fat that are dispersed within the muscle tissue of a cut of meat. The more marbling a cut of steak has, the more flavorful, tender, and juicy it will be when cooked.

The fat is what gives the meat its flavor and also helps to keep it tender and juicy during the cooking process. Think of it like little flavor pockets throughout the steak.

Marbling also plays a role in determining the quality grade of a steak, with Prime beef having the most marbling, followed by Choice and Select beef with less marbling.

So, when you’re buying a steak, pay attention to the marbling. If you want a steak that’s packed with flavor and tenderness, go for a cut that has more marbling. If you’re looking for a leaner option, go for a cut with less marbling.

Beautiful Marbling on a Steak

Preparing the Steak

Let the Steak Come to Room Temperature | Proper Seasoning & Marinating | Season the Entire Steak Generously | How Much Salt Should I Use? | Adding Herbs & Spices

So you’ve picked the perfect steak and you’re ready to make it the star of the show. It’s time for some serious grilling action. But, before you start cooking, you’ve got to give that steak some love.

The following are some key steps to take when preparing a steak for grilling. This includes bringing your steak up to room temperature, using the perfect seasonings and marinades, and finally, using them properly.

More on these key steps for preparing a steak for grilling next.

Letting the Steak Come to Room Temperature Before Grilling

Are you wondering if you should take your steak out of the fridge and let it sit at room temp before grilling?

Yes, you should!

When a steak is super cold and you throw it on a hot grill, the outside of the steak can become overcooked while the inside is still cool. But, if you let the steak sit at room temp for a bit before grilling, it’ll cook more evenly.

Think of it like this, a thin steak that’s been sitting at room temp for a bit will start to cook from the inside out. So, by the time the outside of the steak gets that nice char, the inside will be cooked to the perfect temp. This results in a steak that is evenly cooked throughout, with a nice char on the outside and a juicy and tender inside.

Thicker steaks will still need a little more heat in the center after the outside is seared to perfection. The solution is to move the steak to the indirect side of the grill, shut the lid and let the center cook to your desired doneness. How will you know when it hits your desired temperature? More on that in a minute.

So, how long should you let the steak sit at room temp before grilling? About 30 minutes to an hour should do the trick. Any longer than an hour and you’re risking the steak going bad.

Proper Seasoning & Marinating

Proper seasoning and marinating can go a long way in enhancing the flavor and tenderness of a steak.

First things first, let’s talk seasoning. Salt and pepper are the OG’s of steak seasoning. They help to bring out the natural flavor of the meat and create a nice crust on the exterior. They’re simple, but they get the job done.

But, if you want to take it up a notch, you can add some other herbs and spices to the mix. Garlic powder, oregano, paprika, and cumin are all great options. Just be careful not to overdo it, you don’t want to overpower the natural flavor of the steak.

Now, let’s talk marinades. A marinade is a liquid mixture that you can use to add some extra flavor and tenderness to your steak before cooking. It typically consists of an acid (such as lemon juice or vinegar), oil, and seasonings.

Now, not all steaks need a marinade. Some cuts, like ribeye, already have plenty of flavor and marbling and I don’t suggest using a marinade. But, if you’re using a leaner cut of steak like flank, a marinade can be a game-changer.

Just make sure to choose a marinade that complements the natural flavors of the meat, and don’t over-marinate by leaving the steak in the marinade for too long or you’ll end up with a mushy steak.

Hot Safety Tip: It’s important to discard any marinade that has come in contact with raw meat, as it can contain bacteria.

Proper Seasoning & Marinating of a Steak

Season the Entire Steak Generously

You’re ready to season your steak but you’re not sure the best way to do it. To start, you want to make sure that every single inch of that steak is covered in a delicious blend of seasonings. It’s perfectly acceptable and encouraged to be generous with the amount of seasoning used.

Let’s start with salt and pepper. These are the basics and they’re essential for bringing out the natural flavor of the meat and creating a nice crust on the exterior. Don’t be shy with the amount you use, you want to make sure you’re seasoning all sides of the steak.

Generously Season Your Steak with Salt

How Much Salt Should I Use?

The proper amount of salt to use when seasoning a steak can vary depending on the size and thickness of the steak, and personal preference. However, as a rule of thumb, it is recommended to use about 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt per side of a 1-inch thick steak.

If you are also adding a pre-packaged seasoning mix or a marinade that contains salt, you may want to adjust the amount of salt you’re adding to not over-salt the steak.

Hot Tip: It’s important to note that the salt should be applied just before cooking the steak, and not too far in advance, as salt can draw moisture out of the meat, which can affect the final texture and flavor. Unless you are brining of course, in which case it will need to be added at least an hour or more before grilling.

Adding Herbs & Spices

If you want to take it up a notch and add to the salt and pepper mix, you can add some other herbs and spices to the mix. Garlic powder, oregano, paprika, and cumin are all great additions. Just make sure you’re being generous with the amount you use.

When it comes to seasoning, it’s better to use too much than too little and adjust as you learn. You don’t want a bland steak, you want a steak that’s packed with flavor. Trust me, your taste buds will thank you.

Prepping the Grill

Cleaning the Grates | Preheating the Grill | Creating a Two-Zone Fire | Oiling the Grates

It’s time to fire up the grill, but before you start cooking, you’ve got to make sure that your grill is prepped and ready to go. What does prepping a grill actually involve? Well, there are a few steps you need to follow for the best results.

You should always start your cooking session with clean grates, followed by preheating the grill. The burner configuration is pretty important too. Finally, using a high smoke point oil to prevent sticking will finish the prep.

Below we take a closer look at each step.

Cleaning the Grates

Before you start grilling your steak, you’ve gotta make sure your grates are cleaned and oiled. It’s a quick and easy step that’ll make a big difference in the final product.

Let’s talk cleaning. You want to use a grill grate brush to scrape off any leftover bits from previous grilling sessions. This will prevent the steak from sticking to the grates and ensure that it gets that nice char.

For a more in-depth look at the best methods for cleaning grill grates, you can read my guide: The Ultimate Guide on How to Clean Grill Grates

Preheating the Grill

Preheating the grill is the next step in ensuring that your steak is cooked to perfection. The grill should be preheated to high heat before placing the steak on it.

Turn the burners on high and let that bad boy heat up. Give the grill about 10-15 minutes to get up to temp before placing cooking. This will create a nice char on the outside of the steak while keeping the inside juicy and tender. Starting with an already hot grill will also prevent sticking and promote the caramelization of the meat.

Another advantage is that a preheated grill will help you in controlling the cooking temp and time of the steak.

Creating a Two-Zone Fire

Now that you’ve preheated your grill, you’re ready to start cooking your steak.

But wait, have you created a two-zone fire?

This is an important step for controlling the cooking temperature and preventing the steak from charring too quickly. You don’t want to overcook the steak, right?

A two-zone fire means that you’ll leave one side of the grill with high heat and the other side with low or no heat. This way, if the steak starts to char too quickly or you get a particularly nasty flare-up, you can move it over to the cooler side of the grill.

To create a two-zone fire on a gas grill, turn on all the burners and preheat the grill to high heat. Then, turn off one or more burners on one side of the grill, this will create the low heat zone.

Don’t forget that you can continue to adjust the flame by turning down the heat on the burners that are left on if needed. This will help you to have more control over the cooking temperature.

Oiling the Grates

Finally, let’s talk oiling. Before you put the steak on the grill, give the grates a quick brush with a high smoke point oil like vegetable, canola, or avocado oil. This will help prevent sticking and add a nice crust to the steak. Plus, it’ll add a little extra flavor.

You can use a basting brush or a paper towel to spread the oil. Again, you should stick to vegetable oil or any oil with a high smoke point.

Grilling the Steak

Placement of the Steak | Searing the Steak | Move the Steak to the Low Heat Side | How to Check for Doneness |

Now that you’ve got all the prep work done, it’s time for the fun part. It’s finally time to put your steak on the grill. But how to BBQ a perfect steak on a gas grill? There are a few techniques that will increase your chances of a perfectly cooked steak.

It all comes down to proper placement, nailing the searing process, and knowing when to flip the steak. It also pays to understand the proper cooking time and temperature for cooking your steak. Finally, knowing how to finish your steak on the indirect side of the grill if needed is the last step.

We’re going to walk you through the process of grilling the perfect steak on a gas grill next.

Placement of the Steak on the Grill

The proper placement of the steak is another important factor in achieving the perfect cook. Whether you’re using a gas or charcoal grill, the placement can make a big difference in the final product.

First and foremost, it’s important to understand the difference between direct and indirect heat. Direct heat is when the steak is placed directly over the heat source, while indirect heat is when the steak is placed next to the heat source. The type of heat you use will depend on the cut of the steak and the desired level of doneness.

  • For thicker cuts of steak, such as a ribeye, New York, or a porterhouse, I recommend using a two-zone fire and placing the steak over direct heat for the initial sear, then moving it to indirect heat to finish cooking. This will give you a nice crust on the outside while keeping the inside juicy and tender.
  • For thinner cuts of steak less than ¾ inch thick, such as a flank or a hanger, I recommend using moderate to high direct heat for the entire cook. This will prevent the steak from charring too quickly and allow it to cook evenly.

Next, let’s talk searing!

Searing the Steak

Searing the steak creates a nice crust on the outside while sealing in the juices on the inside, resulting in a more flavorful and juicier final product.

Once the grill is at a searing temperature (you’re shooting for 500 plus °F), place your steak on the grill over the hottest section.

I recommend turning the steak every minute or so, depending on the thickness of the steak and the desired level of doneness. This will ensure even cooking and prevent the steak from charring too quickly. Flipping the steak often will give the steak ample time to form a nice crust on the outside without overcooking it on the inside.

You’re going to want to use tongs rather than a fork to flip it. A fork will puncture the steak and allow the juices to escape. Tongs, on the other hand, will allow you to handle the steak without piercing it and losing juices. A pair of heat-resistant gloves will come in handy for his part.

Searing a Steak on a Gas Grill

Move the Steak to the Low Heat Side to Finish Cooking

After getting a beautiful sear on both sides of the steak, move it to the cooler side of the grill and close the lid.

This technique, also known as indirect or 2-zone grilling allows the steak to finish cooking at a slower pace and prevents it from charring on the outside too quickly.

Use a Meat Thermometer to Check for Doneness

Using a meat thermometer is a game changer when it comes to grilling steaks. It’s a super easy way to make sure your steak is cooked to perfection, without any guesswork.

You just need to get yourself an instant-read thermometer, the kind that you stick into the steak, and it’ll give you a reading in seconds. Just make sure you stick it into the thickest part of the steak, usually the center, so you get an accurate reading.

Now, you might be wondering what temperature to cook your steak to, right? The USDA recommends cooking steak to 145°F for medium-rare, 160°F for medium, and 170°F for well-done.

But as a seasoned griller, I’ll let you in on a little secret, take the steak off the grill 5-10 degrees before it reaches your desired level of doneness because the temperature will continue to rise while resting.

So, just remember to use a meat thermometer, stick it into the thickest part of the steak, take the steak off the grill a few degrees before it reaches your desired level of doneness, and let it rest for a bit. With these tips, you’ll be grilling the perfect steak in no time!

Here is a handy Steak Level of Doneness Chart you can use as a reference.

Steak Level of Doneness Chart

Steak
Level of Doneness
Bleu
Internal Temp (°F)
100-110 degrees
Internal Temp (°C)
38-43 degrees
Steak
Level of Doneness
Rare
Internal Temp (°F)
120-130 degrees
Internal Temp (°C)
49-54 degrees
Steak
Level of Doneness
Medium-rare
Internal Temp (°F)
130–135 degrees
Internal Temp (°C)
54–57 degrees
Steak
Level of Doneness
Medium
Internal Temp (°F)
140–145 degrees
Internal Temp (°C)
60–62 degrees
Steak
Level of Doneness
Medium-well
Internal Temp (°F)
150–155 degrees
Internal Temp (°C)
66–68 degrees
Steak
Level of Doneness
Well-done
Internal Temp (°F)
160–165 degrees
Internal Temp (°C)
71–74 degrees

Resting & Serving

Allowing the Steak to Rest | Serving & Garnishing |

Alright, so you’ve grilled the perfect steak, you’ve checked the temperature and it’s cooked to perfection. But before you go ahead and dig in, there’s one last step that’s super important, and that’s resting the steak.

Why is that important? I’ll explain more about that and also give you ideas for serving, and garnishing the steak as well as some tips for maintaining the steak’s optimal flavor and texture in the steps below.

Allowing the Steak to Rest Before Cutting

Right after you take a steak off the grill, all the juices inside are still hot and have gravitated toward the center. If you cut into it right away, all those juices will come pouring out and you’ll end up with a dry steak. But, if you let it rest for a few minutes, the juices will redistribute throughout your steak and it will be juicier.

So, once you take the steak off the grill, loosely cover it with foil and let it rest for about 5-10 minutes. This will give the steak time to redistribute the juices evenly and make for a more flavorful final product.

Serving & Garnishing

The steak is grilled and you let it rest. Now it’s time to serve it up and make it look as good as it tastes.

In terms of serving the steak, you’ll want to slice it against the grain. This means, if you look at the steak, you’ll see lines running through it, you want to slice perpendicular to those lines. Slicing against the grain will make the steak more tender and easier to chew.

Hot Tip: It’s easier to see the grain of the steak before cooking, so pay attention and make a note of it beforehand.

When it comes to actually serving, you have a few options. You can serve it on a platter or a wooden board, it’ll look rustic and hearty. Or you can go for a more refined look and serve it on a white plate.

As for garnishing, you can keep it simple and just sprinkle a little bit of coarse salt and freshly cracked black pepper over the steak. Or you can get a little fancy and add some herbs like rosemary or thyme, they’ll add a nice freshness and color to the steak.

Another option is to add a compound butter on top of the steak while it’s resting, this will add extra flavor and richness. You can make different kinds of butter with various seasonings and herbs for this. We will talk more about compound butter later in this article.

Now, all that is left to do is enjoy the fruits of your labor.

Resting & Serving a Steak Properly

Pro Tips for Grilling the Perfect Steak

How to Pick the Best Steak | How to Season a Steak | How to Sear a Steak on a Gas Grill | How to Slice a Steak | Try the Reverse Sear Method | Consider Aged Steaks | Add Wood Smoke Flavor | Amp up the Flavor With Compound Butter

As someone who has been grilling for over 25 years, I’ve learned a thing or two about cooking the perfect steak. Here is a quick recap of what we have learned so far before getting into my pro tips.

  1. Start with high-quality meats: You want to make sure you’re using a good cut of meat. It’s worth spending a little extra on high-quality steak from a reputable butcher or meat purveyor.
  2. Room temp is the way to go: Take the steak out of the fridge about 30 minutes before you’re ready to grill. This will allow the steak to come to room temperature, which will help it cook more evenly.
  3. Seasoning is key: Don’t be afraid to season that steak! Salt and pepper are a must, but you can also add other herbs and spices to give them more flavor.
  4. Using a two-zone fire: When you’re grilling, make sure you have a hot side and a cool side. This will allow you to sear the steak on the hot side and then move it to the cool side to finish cooking.
  5. Use a thermometer: Don’t rely on the “finger test” to see if the steak is done. Use a thermometer to check the internal temperature.
  6. Rest it: Once the steak is done, take it off the grill and let it rest for a few minutes. This will allow the juices to redistribute and make for a juicier steak.
  7. Slice against the grain: Once the steak has rested, slice it against the grain. This will make it more tender and easier to chew.

If you’re ready to take your steak grilling skills to the next level I’m here to share some pro tips with you below, so you can impress your friends and family with your next steak.

How to Pick the Best Steak

How to Pick the Best Steak

So you wanna know how to pick the best steak, huh? Well, as someone who does this for a living, I’ve got you covered.

  1. Know your cuts: There are a lot of different cuts of steak out there, from filet mignon to ribeye. Each one has its own unique flavor and texture, so it’s important to know what you’re looking for.
  2. Look for marbling: Marbling is the little white flecks of fat you see in the meat. The more marbling, the more flavorful the steak will be.
  3. Check the color: A good steak should be a nice deep red color, and never brown. You’re looking for something not too dark or too light.
  4. Check the firmness: Don’t be afraid to give the steak a little squeeze before purchasing it. The meat should be firm but not rock-hard.
  5. Smell it: A good steak should have a pleasant meaty smell, not a sour or spoiled smell.
  6. Go for grass-fed or organic: It’s better for your health, the environment, and the animal’s welfare.

Remember, the more you know about the cuts of steak, the better equipped you’ll be to pick the perfect one for your next grilling adventure.

How to Season a Steak

When it comes to seasoning a steak, you can let your creativity shine. While most people prefer a simple salt and pepper combination, the options are endless. Here are some tips on how to properly season a steak.

  • Salt and pepper: The most basic and essential seasoning for any steak, but don’t be shy with it. Season both sides generously, and don’t forget the edges.
  • Dry rubs: Mix together different herbs, spices, and seasonings to create your own dry rub. Some popular choices include garlic powder, onion powder, cumin, paprika, or chili powder.
  • Garlic and Herbs: Crush fresh garlic and herbs, like rosemary, thyme, or oregano, and rub it all over the steak.
  • Wet rubs: Mix together olive oil, mustard, Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce, and any other seasonings you like. Rub it all over the steak.
  • Experiment and have fun: Try different seasonings and combinations until you find your own personal favorite.

Remember, the key is to be generous with the seasoning and to season the steak a few hours before grilling, this will allow the flavors to penetrate the meat. If you don’t have time to season at least one hour before cooking, then wait and do it right before. And again, don’t be afraid to experiment with different seasonings and combinations.

How to Sear a Steak on a Gas Grill

You want to know how to sear a steak like a pro on a gas grill? Then these tips are for you.

  1. Preheat the grill: Turn the grill on high and let it heat up for at least 15 minutes before you start cooking.
  2. Pat the steak dry: Make sure the surface of the steak is dry before you put it on the grill. Moisture on the surface of the steak will cause it to steam instead of searing it. I like to blot the surface with a paper towel before adding my seasoning.
  3. Add seasoning: Season the steak generously with salt and pepper, or any other seasonings you prefer.
  4. Place the steak on the hot side: Put the steak on the hot side of the grill directly over the flames and let it sear for 1-2 minutes per side.
  5. Flip the steak: Use tongs to flip the steak and continue searing for 1-2 minutes per side. Flip as many times as needed until you have the sizzling char you prefer. You may need to shorten the flip times towards the end.
  6. Flipping quickly and often: The reason for the short flip times is to make sure the heat is not penetrating too deeply into the center of the steak at this point. You are looking to mainly cook the outside when searing and can finish on the indirect heat side if more cooking is required in the center after the steak is seared. This will result in a more evenly cooked steak.

Remember, the key to searing a steak is to have a hot surface and dry steak, season it well and don’t move it around too much except for flipping while searing it.

How to Slice a Steak

Everyone who enjoys a well-cooked steak should know how to slice it correctly. Even if the steak is being served at your favorite steak house.

  1. Let the steak rest: After grilling, take the steak off the grill and let it rest for a few minutes before slicing. This allows the juices to redistribute and makes for a juicier steak.
  2. Slice against the grain: Look for the direction of the muscle fibers (the lines on the steak) and slice perpendicular to them. This will make the steak more tender and easier to chew.
  3. Use a sharp knife: A sharp knife will make slicing the steak much easier, so make sure you have a good one on hand.
  4. Cut the steak into thin slices: Make sure the slices are about 1/4-inch thick for optimal tenderness and flavor.
  5. Serve immediately: Once you’ve rested and sliced the steak, serve it right away, as it will lose its juiciness and flavor over time.

Remember, the key is to let the steak rest before slicing, slice it against the grain, and use a sharp knife to cut it into thin slices.

Try the Reverse Sear Method to Achieve a More Flavorful Crust

If your looking for a more flavorful crust on your steak, I’ve got a little trick for you: try the reverse sear method.

  1. Start by preheating your grill to 225°F (107°C) and place your steak on the indirect (cooler) side of the grill. Pro Tip: This part can be done in the oven too.
  2. When the steak reaches about 115-125°F depending on your desired doneness, take the steak out of the grill, loosely cover it with foil, and let it rest for 10-15 minutes. While the steak is resting, it will still be cooking and can come up another 5-10 degrees.
  3. Crank the heat up to high on your grill while the steak is resting.
  4. Now, place the steak on the grill, and sear it for 1 minute per side, flipping it until it is seared to your liking. You want to flip often so the heat does not have time to penetrate too deeply into the meat. You want to cook the outside, not the inside of the meat during this process. The hot grill will create a flavorful crust on the steak.
  5. Once the steak is seared, take it off the grill and serve immediately while it is still hot. Remember, you already rested the steak so there is no need to do so again.

The reverse sear method allows the steak to cook evenly, and it also creates a more flavorful crust because of the initial slow cooking process. Give it a try and let me know how it goes!

Consider Aged Steaks

Another great option to try is an aged steak. I know what your thinking, but safely aging a steak adds a distinctly beefy flavor some people swear by. An aged steak is not for everyone and should not be aged at home unless you know exactly what you are doing for safety reasons.

Aging is the process of storing the steak in a controlled environment, it allows the enzymes naturally present in the beef to break down the connective tissue, resulting in a more tender and flavorful steak.

Aged steaks are usually more expensive than non-aged steaks because of the additional time and care that goes into the aging process.

Dry-aged steaks are considered the best of the best. They are aged for several weeks to a couple of months in a temperature-controlled environment. The meat is exposed to air and the natural enzymes work to break down the connective tissue, resulting in a more intense beef flavor and a more tender texture.

Wet-aged steaks are aged in vacuum-sealed bags. This method is less expensive than dry aging and the steak can be aged for a shorter period of time, but the flavor and texture will not be as intense as dry-aged steaks.

Consider trying both wet-aged and dry-aged steaks to see which one you prefer.

Keep in mind that aged steaks can have a stronger flavor, so use a simple seasoning and let the steak speak for itself.

So, next time you’re at the butcher shop, give an aged steak a try, you might be surprised at how much more flavorful it is!

Adding Wood Chips or Chunks for Added Smoke Flavor

Want to add some smoky flavor to your grill game? Then you’re going to like our next tip: adding wood chips or chunks to your gas grill.

This technique works best when cooking with the lid closed so thinner cuts that grill up quickly will not benefit much from the smoke.

  1. Start by creating a foil pouch and filling it with wood chips.
  2. Place the foil packet on the grill grates, close to the flame but not directly on it. This will allow the wood chips to smoke without catching fire.
  3. Turn on the grill and let it heat up. Once the wood chips start to smoke, you can place your food on the grill
  4. Keep an eye on the wood chips, if they stop smoking, you can add more or make another foil packet.
  5. You can experiment with different types of wood to get different flavors, such as mesquite, hickory, apple, or cherry.
  6. Remember, a little bit of smoke goes a long way, so use it sparingly.

Pro Tip: When using a foil packet, there is no need to soak your chips as wet chips will result in more steam than smoke.

Adding wood chips or chunks to your gas grill can add a smoky flavor to your steak that is hard to replicate with just the grill itself.

Amp up the Flavor With Compound Butter

My final tip for amping up the flavor of a steak is a game-changer for many. This is done by adding compound butter to the finished steak while it is still hot.

Compound butter is simply butter that has herbs, spices, or other flavorings added to it. It can be made in advance and stored in the refrigerator or freezer to harden up.

To make compound butter, you will need butter and any combination of herbs and spices that you like. Some popular choices are garlic, shallot, parsley, thyme, rosemary, and red pepper flakes.

  1. Soften the butter at room temperature, then mix in the herbs and spices. Form the butter into a log, wrap it in plastic wrap and refrigerate it until firm.
  2. Once the butter is firm, slice off a piece and place it on top of the steak while it’s still hot. The compound butter will melt over the steak and infuse it with flavor.

You can also use compound butter to add flavor to other proteins like fish, chicken, or pork.

Get creative with the flavors, you can use herbs, spices, garlic, shallot, lemon zest, etc.

Remember, a little bit of compound butter goes a long way, so use it sparingly.

Using compound butter on your steak is an easy and delicious way to add more flavor.

BBQ Steak on a Gas Grill FAQ

What’s the Best Gas Grill Temperature for Steak | How Long to BBQ Steak on a Gas Grill | Do I Need to Let My Steak Rest Before Slicing? | What Are the Best Steaks for Grilling? | How Do I Store Leftover Steak?

Are you looking to take your steak game to the next level? Look no further, because I’ve got the answers to your burning questions on grilling up the perfect steak on a gas grill.

From how hot your gas grill should be for cooking steak, how to tell when your steak is done, how to store leftover steak, and everything in between. So, grab your tongs and fire up that gas grill, ’cause we’re about to make some mouthwatering steak that’ll have your taste buds dancing.

If you have a question that I didn’t cover, leave it in the comments, and I will get you the answer. Who knows? I might even add it to our list.

Let’s get to it!

What’s the Best Gas Grill Temperature for Steak

The best gas grill temperature for steak on a gas grill is between 450-600 plus °F (232-315°C) to start with. This high heat allows for the steak to sear quickly and develop a nice crust on the outside while maintaining a juicy and tender interior.

It’s important to note that a two-zone fire is recommended for thicker steaks, which means having one side of the grill very hot and the other side less hot. This allows the steak to be seared on the hot side and then moved to the cooler side to finish cooking to the desired doneness. I recommend turning the heat down to finish cooking the steak. 350-400°F is ideal but not absolutely necessary.

It’s also a good idea to use a meat thermometer to check the steak’s internal temperature, to make sure it reaches the desired level of doneness.

If you’re grilling a thinner steak, you can lower the gas grill temp for steak to 375-400°F (190-204°C), as it doesn’t need as much time to cook.

How Long to BBQ Steak on a Gas Grill

The cooking time for grilling a steak will depend on the thickness of the steak and the desired level of doneness. A general rule of thumb is 3-5 minutes per side for medium-rare, 5-7 minutes per side for medium, and 7-10 minutes per side for well-done.

However, it is always best to use a meat thermometer to ensure the steak is cooked to your desired level of doneness.

The internal temperature of the steak should reach:

  • 130-135°F (54-57°C) for rare
  • 140-145°F (60-63°C) for medium-rare
  • 150-155°F (66-68°C) for medium
  • 160-165°F (71-74°C) for well-done.

It’s also important to note that a steak should rest for a few minutes after grilling to allow the juices to redistribute, which will result in a juicier steak.

Do I Need to Let My Steak Rest Before Slicing?

Yes, it is important to let your steak rest before slicing. When a steak is cooked, the juices inside the meat are heated and can become concentrated in the center of the steak. If you slice into the steak immediately after cooking, these juices will flow out and the steak will be less juicy and flavorful.

Allowing the steak to rest for a few minutes before slicing will allow the juices to redistribute throughout the meat. It is recommended to let your steak rest for at least 5-10 minutes, depending on the size of the steak.

It is also important to note that while the steak is resting, the internal temperature will continue to rise, so it’s best to pull the steak off the grill a little bit before it reaches your desired doneness, then let it rest to finish cooking.

What Are the Best Steaks for Grilling?

The best steaks for grilling are ribeye, strip steak, T-bone, and porterhouse. They have a good balance of fat and flavor and hold up well to high heat. But if you ask me, the ribeye is the way to go. It’s got a ton of marbling, which means it’s packed with flavor and stays juicy and tender on the grill.

If you’re looking for something a bit leaner, the strip steak (or New York Strip) is a solid choice too. It’s got a good balance of flavor and tenderness, and it’s always a crowd-pleaser. So, whether you’re grilling for a big party or a small family dinner, ribeye and strip steak are both great options for the grill.

How Do I Store Leftover Steak?

Leftover steak should be stored properly to maintain its quality and prevent bacterial growth. Most likely you have been doing it wrong this entire time. The best way to store leftover steak is to let it cool to room temperature before storing it. Next, you want to:

  • Wrap it tightly in plastic wrap or aluminum foil. This will help to prevent air and moisture from getting to the steak, which can cause it to dry out or spoil.
  • Don’t forget to pour any leftover juices on top of the steak before wrapping it up.
  • Place it in an airtight container and store it in the refrigerator. The steak should be eaten within 3 days.
  • If you have a lot of leftover steak, you can also freeze it. To do this, wrap it tightly in plastic wrap or aluminum foil, then place it in a freezer bag or airtight container. The steak can be stored in the freezer for up to 3 months. When ready to eat, thaw the steak in the refrigerator before reheating.
  • When reheating the steak, do not overcook it as it can cause the steak to become dry and tough.

By following these steps, you can bet that your leftover steak will stay fresh and flavorful.

Final Thoughts on Our How to BBQ a Steak on a Gas Grill Guide

Well, my friends, that’s it! We’ve gone over everything from selecting the perfect cut of steak, and prepping the grill, to getting that perfect sear and doneness. You should now have all the knowledge and skills you need to grill up a steak on a gas grill that’ll have your friends and family asking for seconds.

To recap, we learned about the importance of selecting the right cut of steak, the best thickness, and marbling, preparing the steak by letting it come to room temperature, seasoning it, and prepping the grill. Also, we talked about the importance of cooking at the right temperature, searing and resting the steak, and checking for doneness with a meat thermometer.

And remember, grilling is all about experimenting and finding your perfect combination. So, don’t be afraid to try different seasonings and cuts of steak. You never know, you might discover your new favorite way to grill a steak.

So, now that you know all the tips and tricks, it’s time to put them to use! Fire up that gas grill and get grilling! Don’t forget to invite me over for a taste test, I’m sure it will be delicious. Happy grilling!

Cheers,

Pat G.

Next Steps:

How to BBQ Burgers on a Gas Grill – A Comprehensive Guide

How to BBQ Hamburgers on a Gas Grill

How to Cook BBQ Ribs on a Gas Grill

How to Cook BBQ Ribs on a Gas Grill

How to Smoke on a Gas Grill – Simple Setup and Technique

How to Smoke on a Gas Grill – Simple Setup & Technique

Now It’s Your Turn

I want to hear from you:

Which methods have you used to grill steak on a gas grill?

Do you have any tips or tricks to share for grilling steak on a gas grill?

Are you going to be purchasing a smoker in the future?  Or do you plan on looking at a pellet grill, built-in or standalone gas grill, or charcoal model?

Let me know by leaving a quick comment below.

If you still have questions, please feel free to send me a message.

Cheers,

Pat G.

DisclosureAt The Grilling Life, I am committed to researching and writing thoughtful, informative and editorially independent reviews of the best products for your outdoor cooking needs.  If you like what I do, you can support me through my chosen links, which earn me a commission.  This allows me to continue sharing with you my love for all things barbecue.  Your support is truly appreciated.

Patrick Ginise

A backyard warrior, certified carnivore, lover of good whiskey, grill master and I’m Living The Grilling Life!

I have a passion for cooking with live fire and smoke, no matter the weather. I’m a real person just like you, who loves outdoor cooking and BBQ. Food, fun, and time spent with family and friends are what it’s all about! It is my mission to take my passion and knowledge for outdoor cooking and all things BBQ and share this expertise in techniques and grilling equipment with you. In other words, Living The Grilling Life!

I have personally tested over 150+ Grills and Smokers and hundreds of grilling thermometers, temperature controllers, grill brushes, grilling tools, fire starters, and other BBQ products.